ADJUVANTS FAQ     
What are they? 

An adjuvant is something which is added to the product formulation or spray solution to enhance the effectiveness of the herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide.  Adjuvants are specialized chemicals which must be matched to a particular herbicide, weed spectrum and environmental range to ensure that they enhance, and not detract from the effectiveness of the herbicide.

Why use them?

There are two main reasons why adjuvants are used in spray solutions.
 

    1.    REDUCE SPRAY APPLICATION PROBLEMS

    2.    IMPROVE HERBICIDE PERFORMANCE

 

Researchers have found that up to 70% of the effectiveness of a pesticide can be dependent on the spray application.  Spray application is the weakest link the pesticide follows through its synthesis, testing, registration and final use.

 

Spray tank problems can be observed by the applicator can be corrected with adjuvants such as compatibility or anti-foaming agents.  Many problems are invisible to the applicator but have a greater effect on the herbicide’s activity than those that are more visible.  Activator adjuvants correct many of these invisible problems by increasing the wetting, spreading, sticking, emulsifying and dispersing of the herbicide.

How do they work?

Activator adjuvants are the group of adjuvants that increase the biological activity of the herbicide beyond that obtained without the material added.  Activator adjuvants are usually classified by their physical characteristics.  There are four major classes of activator adjuvants:

 

    1.    NON-IONIC SURFACTANTS 

    2.    CROP OIL CONCENTRATES

    3.    FERTILIZER SOLUTIONS

    4.    METHYLATED SEED OILS

 

Activator adjuvants enhance the performance of the herbicide in the following ways:    

WETTING, REDUCING SURFACE TENSION AND IMPROVING PENETRATION.